Webinars

Reports

Knocking at the College Door provides useful, accurate data to plan for the coming years. These reports highlight various aspects of the data and insights into the implications of the changing demographics facing the nation.

Presentations

 

The Northeast and Midwest: Advancing the Public College and University Mission Amid Regional Population Loss

Demographic changes in the Northeast and parts of the Midwest continue to capture national headlines, as colleges and universities compete for ever-shrinking numbers of in-state students. For public colleges and universities leaders, particularly in the rural Northeast and the Midwest, substantial population loss threatens the ability of these campuses to recruit enough students to advance their mission and drive regional development. Campus leaders need to be innovative and strategic as they seek to attract students and build a sustainable institution for the next generation.

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The American Association of State Colleges and Universities (AASCU) and the Western Interstate Commission on Higher Education (WICHE) co-hosted a webinar exploring the changing demographics of the Northeast and Midwest from the perspective of higher education. WICHE’s Knocking at the College Door projections of high school graduates provide a view of the changing demographics in these two regions. The presidents of Northern Michigan University and the University of Southern Maine discuss their strategies for advancing the public college and university mission in regions marked by precipitous declines in the number of high school graduates.

Improving Student Success at Public Colleges and Universities Amid Population Growth and Increasing Diversity

For many public colleges and universities located in the South and West, state demographic projections forecast growing numbers of high school graduates and greater student diversity than ever before. Most of the high school graduates that pursue college opportunities will attend colleges and universities in the public sector. For Southern and Western states to meet future workforce needs, it remains essential that public higher education leaders pursue strategies that provide the structure, support and resources necessary to help these students succeed in college.

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The American Association of State Colleges and Universities (AASCU) and the Western Interstate Commission on Higher Education (WICHE) are co-hosted a webinar that explored the changing demographics of the South and West from the perspective of higher education. The webinar featured the findings of WICHE’s new Knocking at the College Door report, with a focus on the changing demographics in these two regions. Panelists from Northern Arizona University and University of Texas Rio Grande Valley, two diverse, growing campuses, highlighted their strategies aimed at increasing student success in a rapidly changing demographic environment.

 

High School Graduate Trends: (How) Can Northeast Colleges Thrive as Student Populations Contract?

Learn strategies to respond to the changing demographics in the Northeast from the largest comprehensive system of higher education in the US. The State University of New York (SUNY) is comprised of 64 campuses spread across New York and each year serves nearly 600,000 students in credit-bearing courses.  Through the strategic use of data and creating a $50+ million performance improvement fund, SUNY has been supporting campuses to survive and thrive in a changing student environment.

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Building off WICHE’s depiction of high school graduate trends for the next 15 years, Teresa Foster, Senior Assistant Provost and Interim Director of SUNY’s Office of Institutional Research and Data Analytics, provided insights into how the system is using data to drive change and Carey Hatch, SUNY’s Interim Senior Associate Provost for Academic Services discussed how SUNY is supporting campuses in responding to changing demographics. 

This September 19, 2017 webinar was co-sponsored by WICHE and SUNY’s SAIL Institute.

Northeastern Region: Data & Implications

In this webinar hosted in collaboration with the New England Board of Higher Education (NEBHE), you will hear that after an increase of 19 percent in the number of graduates between 2000 and 2012, the Northeast region is not expected to reach those numbers again. The declines are driven by rapid contraction in the majority White student population in numbers too large that even robust growth of non-White populations will not offset them. Ross Gittell with the New Hampshire Community College System, Nyal Fuentes with the Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education, and Peter Francese, a demographics and consumer markets expert, provide their reactions about these trends and how to accommodate them.

 

Midwestern Region: Data & Implications

In this webinar hosted in collaboration with the Midwestern Higher Education Compact (MHEC), you will hear that the Midwest faces steady declines in the total number of graduates in the coming years, resulting mostly from a rapidly contracting White youth population that is not offset by otherwise robust increases in the number of non-White graduates. Illinois, Michigan, and Ohio have generated about 48 percent of the region’s graduates in recent years and are a driving force of the projected trends in the Midwest. Eric Lichtenberger with the Illinois Board of Higher Education and Olga Volokhova with the Indiana Department of Workforce Development provide insights about what these trends mean for the Midwest and how to accommodate them.

Southern Region: Data & Implications

This webinar was hosted in collaboration with the Southern Regional Education Board (SREB). 

Knocking at the College Door, the Western Interstate Commission for Higher Education’s projections of high school graduates, shows that the South is the only U.S. region that will see significant and steady increases in the number of high school graduates in the near future.  While the West will see slight increases, the Northeast and the Midwest will continue experiencing declines in the number of high school graduates, the WICHE report projects. After increasing 28 percent between 2000 and 2012, the number of high school graduates in the Southern region is expected to increase another 11 percent by 2025. The South is the only region projected to produce more high school graduates by the early 2030s compared to 2012. Most of the increase in the region will come from growing Hispanic and Asian student populations. Hear from one of the authors of Knocking at the College Door and experts from the SREB region about how the changing demographics facing the South could affect K-12 enrollments, college demand and access, workforce trends, and state and institutional decision-making:

Demarée Michelau, Vice President, Policy Analysis and Research, WICHE

Susan Lounsbury, Director of Education Data Services, SREB

Kate Akers, Executive Director, Kentucky Center for Education and Workforce Statistics

Jean Massey, Associate Superintendent for Secondary Education and Career and Technical Education, Mississippi Department of Education

David Wright, Senior Advisor for Policy and Strategy, Tennessee Higher Education Commission

Western Region: Data & Implications

Hear from WICHE staff about how, after an increase of 24 percent in the number of graduates in the West between 2000 and 2012, the total number of graduates is expected to increase by 4 percent from the class of 2013 to the class of 2024. Then, high school graduates from the West are projected to decrease 8 percent in the early 2030's. Most of the growth in the region comes from the growing Hispanic youth population, with variation across the Western states. Kim Poast with Denver Public Schools and Rod Gramer with Idaho Business for Education discuss what these trends mean for their states and offer ideas about improving educational outcomes among high school graduates.